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Unfortunately, we are still here– directly across the street from ear splitting music and 50,000 fans. Cally came down with some intestinal bug and now I am feeling ill. So, we bailed out of our journey down to the National Park. Cally spent the day in bed and I took care of her as best I could, considering all she wanted was a large bottle of coke. This afternoon I went down to see an exhibition at the Australian Centre for Contemporary Art and the National Gallery. I was very impressed with both the buildings and the art.

Unfortunately, the music is going to be going on for another four hours and then it will be another hour at least before things are quiet. I’m keeping my fingers crossed that they don’t decide to deconstruct the stage and all the metal fencing after the concert. This, too, shall pass.


StephanieI am picking this up again after a hiatus of a few days. The construction work on the road is over, but University College had its own construction project in the works that began in earnest the day before yesterday. They are adding an entire wing to the main building, which will join the ends of both wings, turning the rose garden into an enclosure. This will take a good part of a year to complete. Right now we are living adjacent to the action. It is nearly noon now. Stephanie crawled from her bed into ours around eight this morning, since her bedroom is even noisy than ours. She’s sleeping peacefully now, even through the peircing punctuation of the backup alarms and the rattle of the treads on the giant earthmoving equipment. Amazing. Across the road, Princes Park now resembles a medieval city, complete with moat (chain link fencing) and giant white tents that resemble canvas castles. This tent city has been constructed for the Big Day Out, which we will now miss because I have booked us into a cottage on Sunday night about three hours south of here. We’ll be staying near Wilson’s Promontory, a National Park that is reputed to be beautiful. We should have some peace and quiet for at least one night before we move. I’m renting a car for this excursion, but we have some money down on a Subaru Forester. So, we are ready for the Outback.


The wings that brought us here were made of steel, but the fuel that drove the engines came from the decomposed remains of plants and animals millions of years old. I dreaded the long flight, since it followed on the heels of a long drive from Gainesville, Florida to Nova Scotia, then two flights from Halifax that took us to San Francisco. The flight from DC to San Francisco seemed particularly long. Fortunately, my son, Dolan was there to meet us and we were able to spend two days doting on my grandson, Lucas Alexander.

We boarded the flight about 11 PM, and finally took off an hour later. I was well prepared, with a very long novel by William Boyd called “Any Human Heart” and several books on an MP3 player. The one I listened to on the way over was called “Holy Cow!” I hadn’t really taken notice when I downloaded it that the author was a woman journalist from Melbourne. It was a fascinating account of a year she spent in India. It was a trip she made for love. The first time she went through India she hated it, but her boyfriend (soon to become her fiancee) was stationed in New Delhi as a reporter in the region. Thanks to Dolan, I had an excellent set of noise reduction headphones that helped reduce the engine throb considerably. In addition to what I had with me, Quantas was pretty generous with it’s media selection. I watched most of “The Illusionist” and an intense Aussie psychological thriller called “The Last Train to Freo.” Stephanie and I slept and watched movies and time passed remarkably quickly. Even eighteen hours.

We landed in Sydney and changed planes for Melbourne without having to go through customs or immigration. I was very grateful for that, since it meant we didn’t have to manhandle our luggage twice. Fortunately, we were met at the airport by a hired driver who brought us to where we are staying now– at University College, one of eleven colleges on the campus at the University of Melbourne. Cally has stayed here before, and thought it would be a good transitional home for us. We have an apartment to ourselves with a kitchen, but all three meals are available in the dining hall. These apartments are generally used by visiting professors. Since Cally is an incoming professor, it was considered appropriate. Until last night, we were very comfortable here. That is when the road work began.

The road work, which started just as we were going to bed and apparently went on all night, was on Cemetery Road, which is just across from the gravel parking lot directly outside our window. We are situated at the top of the University campus, at the very bottom of a large, irregular oval favored by runners and soccer players and dog owners–Princes Park. This coming weekend the park is going to be the site of one of the largest musical events in the country– The Big Day Out. That seems to be the reason they are repairing the road. Lucky us. Rumor has it that ticket prices are somewhere around $100 Australian. I have no doubt that we are going to be able to hear if for free. Unless we make a break for it.

So far, our excursions have been limited. Stephanie and I went to the zoo, which is walking distance from where we are staying. Stephanie has been to St. Kilda beach (twice), and we have been out to an animal preserve about an hour from here called Healesville Sanctuary. It was not much different from the zoo, really, but all the animals there are from Australia and the setting is pretty. It is located in a hilly region to the Southwest of Melbourne called the Dandenongs. The area was formed by volcanic activity, originally, but it looks very tame and mellow now. There are some excellent vineyards in the area that we are planning to explore later.

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